Subscribe to RSS Feed

If we want to improve mental health, first we need to tackle poverty | Dawn Foster

May 2nd, 2017 by

Prince Harry’s intervention on mental health is welcome, but removing stigma alone is not enough – the debate needs to look at the role of poverty

Mental health discourse welcomed an unexpected participant this month. Prince Harry, the fifth in line to the throne, spoke publicly about seeking counselling following his mother’s sudden death in his pre-teen years. Rightly, mental health charities praised his intervention, highlighting as it did that even extreme privilege cannot shelter us from depression, anxiety or any other psychiatric illness. Our bodies are fragile, and our minds equally so: this message is increasingly accepted as people with mental health problems, campaigners and medics alike have fought to end stigma by building a national conversation on mental health.

Removing the stigma around mental health is important but does little alone. Without services, treatment is still inadequate, and feeling less judged for your health issues means little if you’re faced with a lack of access to talking therapies and nonexistent community support. But the conversation on mental health also needs to examine how the structures of society cause and perpetuate poor mental health.

Related: On mental health, the royal family is doing more than our government | William Davies

Failing to address childhood mental health linked to poverty is like scrimping on a car repair only to crash into a wall

Continue reading…

Continue Reading »
0 Comments

Drugs didn’t work for my brother. Electroconvulsive therapy did | Andrew Mayers

May 2nd, 2017 by

Doctors tried everything in an effort to treat the depression that engulfed my brother. In the end, the only thing that did any good was ECT

The death certificate said heart attack. But anyone familiar with what my brother had been through over the last decade of his life knew the real cause of death: depression. A self-depleting torment that knew no rock bottom; a psychological tumour that consumed his personality.

Related: Electroconvulsive therapy on the rise again in England

Continue reading…

Continue Reading »
0 Comments

Bravery behind Bryony Gordon’s royal reflections

May 2nd, 2017 by

Every credit to the Telegraph writer for talking about her mental struggles – and, on the subject of struggles, it will be fascinating to see if a former MP, with no experience of journalism, is up to editing the Evening Standard

Bryony Gordon made only the most modest claims in her reflective Telegraph piece about that chat with Prince Harry. “I think this interview is special, not because it’s a scoop or an exclusive. I don’t think this interview is special because I happened to do it. I think it is special because, in Britain, we don’t talk about our feelings. We have bitten our lips, slapped on rictus grins, kept buggering on.

“It has always been a sign of strength and dignity to keep it all inside, and our royal family have always been the embodiment of that, God bless them. But Prince Harry just redefined strength and dignity for a new generation.”

Continue reading…

Continue Reading »
0 Comments

We’re worlds apart, but like Prince Harry I had to face up to depression

May 2nd, 2017 by

Prince Harry has spoken of his bereavement, Tony Howard recalls how therapy helped him with the loss of his brother-in-law

Turning the corner into my mother-in-law’s street some years ago, it hit me. Michael’s car wasn’t there. Which meant Michael wasn’t there. And Michael wasn’t there because he was gone and none of us would ever see him again. We wouldn’t hear him laugh, we would never again be the butt of his jokes and none of us would share again in his generosity.

The moment of that dreadful realisation came back last week, reading Prince Harry’s comments about mental health and his battle with bereavement. Although our circumstances couldn’t be more different – my issues manifested themselves on a north Manchester council estate, rather than in a royal residence – the feelings of loss and subsequent pain will have been very similar.

Related: On mental health, the royal family is doing more than our government | William Davies

Related: The lesson of Prince Harry’s grief? We need mental health services for all | Suzanne Moore

Continue reading…

Continue Reading »
0 Comments

Why scientists should start taking orgasm seriously

May 2nd, 2017 by

Orgasms are big business, but there’s surprising little scientific research being done into how they actually work. There are urgent reasons to fix this

As a DPhil student on a four-year funded programme, I had the rare luxury of a year to decide on the major focus of my research. After reading around, I got interested in the science of orgasm and anorgasmia (difficulty or inability to orgasm). It seemed like an ideal research topic – it has social value, it’s a young field with lots of progress ready to be made, and it wouldn’t leave people at parties yawning when they asked what I did.

Unfortunately, it didn’t come to fruition – partly because almost nobody is doing research on it, and I couldn’t find an appropriate supervisor.

Related: ‘Golden trio’ of moves boosts chances of female orgasm, say researchers

Continue reading…

Continue Reading »
0 Comments

Princes William and Harry break mental health taboos for a new generation | Simon Wessely

May 2nd, 2017 by

There is no correct way to deal with trauma and grief. But the brothers are showing that it’s OK to dispense with the stiff upper lip and ask for help

Big boys don’t cry, so I was told as a child. But has that always been the case? Nelson’s captains as they made their slow way towards the French fleet at Cape Trafalgar certainly didn’t think so. Many had wept when first shown the battle plan. Tears were not unmanly – far from it. Nelson’s captains were “men of feeling”, part of the culture of sensibility. And this wasn’t just an affectation of the gentry: jolly Jack Tar wasn’t always jolly, and wept buckets on numerous occasions captured in contemporary accounts.

Politicians such as Edmund Burke and Charles James Fox were also liable to burst into tears in moments of high parliamentary emotion, as shown in many satirical drawings. As Thomas Dixon describes in his splendid Weeping Britannia: Portrait of a Nation in Tears, it was not until the Victorian era that stoicism replaced sensibility, and the cult of the “stiff upper lip” was born. And it wasn’t even British – the phrase had been popular in the United States for several decades before it first made an appearance over here.

Related: Prince William: suicide callout shed light on men’s mental health

Related: The lesson of Prince Harry’s grief? We need mental health services for all | Suzanne Moore

Continue reading…

Continue Reading »
0 Comments

Prince William: suicide callout shed light on men’s mental health

May 2nd, 2017 by

Duke of Cambridge says dealing with male suicides in his work as an air ambulance pilot helped him understand scale of issue

The Duke of Cambridge has spoken of his shock at being called out to his first suicide as an air ambulance pilot in a joint interview with his brother, Prince Harry, on tackling masculinity and mental health issues.

Related: ‘So low sometimes’: why Stormzy talking about his depression is so important | Kamran Ahmed

Continue reading…

Continue Reading »
0 Comments

The body beautiful: in search of freeze-dried blueberries, Mr Universe and a twerk-out

May 2nd, 2017 by

Sydney’s Fitness Show offers a peek at the latest, greatest and most bizarre new trends in the $8.5bn fitness industry

The steady stream of trim people kitted out in fluoro and black Lycra navigating the vast underground car park is the giveaway.

Despite the fact that it’s a gloriously sunny Saturday morning – dare I say perfect for running in the park – the fit and the wannabe fit are headed to Sydney’s newly reopened International Convention Centre, this year’s home for the Fitness Show for a peek at the latest, greatest and most bizarre new trends in the $8.5bn fitness industry.

Continue reading…

Continue Reading »
0 Comments

Don’t feed seagulls or pick blackberries: how to go for a walk and not get arrested

May 2nd, 2017 by

It used to be one of life’s simple pleasures, but now park rules and regulations mean going for a stroll could cost you an arm and a leg

Walking – sorry, taking the 10,000 steps a day required to keep you from having a heart attack/getting cancer/becoming crippled by anxiety caused by failing to walk 10,000 steps a day – is supposed to be an innocent activity. It’s free, good for you, and you get to avoid following the latest election/Brexit horrors and watch some blossom drifting down a drain instead. Unfortunately, walking can be as fraught with disillusionment as scrolling through your Twitter feed. New rules imposed in Hampshire, which could be rolled out to other councils, stipulate that dog owners who walk more than four animals at a time could face a fine of up to £100. And there are plenty more metaphorical (and actual) poops to avoid on your daily perilous stroll. Here’s how to go for a walk and not get arrested.

Related: Pecking order: East Devon district council to fine seagull feeders

Continue reading…

Continue Reading »
0 Comments

How was your weekend running?

May 2nd, 2017 by

Lets talk recovery, cakes and weekend racing. Not necessarily in that order. Come and share your recipes and running below the line as always

You guys. Last week’s comments below the line were just overwhelming. I can’t thank you enough (or bake enough cake for all of you) but thank you from the bottom of my now-about-73%-chocolate-and-cake heart. I have wallowed in self-pity and now come out the other side, ready to begin again. Or at least get back into training at some point before I actually just have melted butter running around my veins.

But enough about me. There were plenty of races on this weekend, from yesterday’s Hackney Half, to fell races, to Milton Keynes marathon – about to start as I write this. Who has PBs, PWs or cake recipes to share?

Continue reading…

Continue Reading »
0 Comments

Powered by WP Robot