Subscribe to RSS Feed

BBC presenter goes into labour soon after appearing on TV – video report

Dec 2nd, 2016 by

BBC presenter Victoria Fritz gave birth on Tuesday afternoon, having been live on air that morning, to report on the latest business headlines. Fritz’s waters prematurely broke shortly after leaving the studio. Her husband was stuck in traffic and so BBC Breakfast presenter Sally Nugent was her birthing partner. The BBC later said that “BBC Breakfast are well used to delivering the news and this special arrival was a real team labour of love. We send our warmest congratulations to Victoria and Dan”

Continue reading…

Continue Reading »
0 Comments

BBC presenter goes into labour after appearing on live TV

Dec 2nd, 2016 by

Victoria Fritz, who reports business news on BBC Breakfast, gave birth to a boy with fellow newsreader as birthing partner

A BBC presenter went into labour shortly after reading the news on live TV, and gave birth to a boy with a fellow newsreader by her side.

Victoria Fritz, who presents the business news on BBC Breakfast, was not due to give birth until early December, but her waters broke on Tuesday after leaving the studio.

Continue reading…

Continue Reading »
0 Comments

Should humans drink cow’s milk?

Dec 2nd, 2016 by

The consumption of cow’s milk is in decline as lactose intolerance does for dairy what gluten intolerance has done to bread. But if you are northern European, you are genetically modified to consume milk

It is said that the average person consumes 144 pints of cow’s milk a year, but 40% of that is poured on to cereal. The definition of what an average person is seems to include 60% who are children. But what was once touted as the one-stop supplier of most nutrients is going out of fashion – Americans drink 37% less milk than they did in the 1970s, and in the UK dairy consumption overall has fallen by a third in the past 20 years.

Milk is increasingly getting a bad press. What gluten intolerance did for bread, lactose intolerance is doing to milk. A recent blog suggested: “Maybe people are drinking less milk because it is poisonous to many of us.”

Continue reading…

Continue Reading »
0 Comments

Can worrying about your health make you ill?

Dec 2nd, 2016 by

People with health anxiety are more likely to develop heart disease, says a study – news that will only make them more stressed. Psychological therapy is the best treatment …

Most people are happy if their medical test results come back negative – but for at least 5% of us such news brings no relief. If you have health anxiety, there is no test on earth to reassure you. You may pore over the internet picking the most serious diagnosis for your symptoms. And last week brought evidence that health anxiety can make you physically ill. A study of more than 7,000 Norwegians found that people with such anxiety had a 73% greater chance of developing heart disease over 10 years, compared with those who weren’t anxious.

Continue reading…

Continue Reading »
0 Comments

What should I take paracetamol for?

Dec 2nd, 2016 by

The drug has no measurable effect on acute back pain, according to a new study – so what should you be using it to treat?

Suffering from back pain, headache, fever or cold? The pill of choice is usually paracetamol. The drug was introduced into the market in 1956, and GPs issue a staggering 22.9m prescriptions for paracetamol every year. So it’s disconcerting to read that it’s largely ineffective, according to a blog on Evidently Cochrane.

Continue reading…

Continue Reading »
0 Comments

Should I let my dog lick my face?

Dec 2nd, 2016 by

It may seem like a harmless display of affection, but allowing your pet to ‘kiss’ you could be dangerous – or even fatal

Who doesn’t let their dog give them a slobbery “kiss”? Most of the time it doesn’t matter – until it does. Your dog may be part of your family, but the bacteria in its mouth are different from those in yours. As John Oxford, emeritus professor of virology and bacteriology at Queen Mary University London, recently told the Hippocratic Post, dogs spend half their life with their noses in nasty corners or hovering over dog droppings, so their muzzles are full of bacteria, viruses and germs of all sorts.

Mostly, despite these bugs being unknown to our immune systems, we avoid getting sick. But there are bacteria in dogs’ (and cats’) mouths that are zoonotic, that is, they can cause diseases in humans. They include clostridium, E coli and campylobacter, which cause gastroenteritis. Pasteurella multocida, a dog’s normal mouth bacterium, was blamed for meningitis in 42 infants in France under the age of four between 2001 and 2011. Nearly half the babies were newborn, and most were infected as a result of dogs or cats licking them. Four died. The authors of the paper suggest that contact between infants and pets should be reduced.

Continue reading…

Continue Reading »
0 Comments

Does taking more selfies make you happier?

Dec 2nd, 2016 by

Taking photos of one’s self is often thought to be addictive and unhealthy. But a recent report suggests it could actually improve your mood

Want to be happy? Lift your smartphone in the air, angle it to the best side of your face, and click – because selfies make you happy, according to a recent report. Google estimates that, in 2014, at least 93m selfies a day were posted on Android phones alone, and the Pew Research Center says more than 91% of teenagers have posted a self portrait online.

But the ubiquitous selfie irritates the hell out of anyone over 40 years of age and is more usually associated in the media with unhappy outcomes. Last year, more people died worldwide while taking selfies than from shark attacks – mostly from falling but also from being hit by vehicles and even gored by a bull. The selfie has also been linked to mental health problems. In 2014, a study from Ohio State University found that men who posted the most selfies on social media scored highest on questionnaires for narcissistic and psychopathic traits. An editorial by Dr Pankaj Shah in the International Journal of Emergency Mental Health and Human Resilience also argued that taking selfies was addictive and that spending more than five minutes on a selfie or taking more than three to five a day may be “considered a disease”. So, when a hoax news report in 2014 claimed that Selfitis was a new mental health problem defined by the American Psychiatric Association as “the obsessive compulsive desire to take photos of one’s self and post them on social media”, many people believed it.

Continue reading…

Continue Reading »
0 Comments

Is flossing your teeth a waste of time?

Dec 2nd, 2016 by

The US health department has stopped recommending it, but the NHS is still in favour. So, should you bother?

“I don’t need to floss” is a sentence my dentist never used to hear – not until recently, when the latest Dietary Guidelines for Americans stopped recommending it. Now, lots of his patients are telling him they’ve stopped. Despite the NHS advising daily flossing – and almost all dentists being fans of interdental cleaningan investigation by Associated Press found “little proof that flossing works”.

But how can it not be good for you? Between our teeth are interdental sites coated in dental plaque. Plaque is a layer of bacteria mixed with organic matter that coats teeth and causes gum inflammation (gingivitis) and tooth decay. Early warning signs include bleeding gums. Toothbrushes get rid of plaque from other surfaces, but are not so good between teeth. Surely floss can reach the parts that brushes can’t?

Continue reading…

Continue Reading »
0 Comments

Is casual sex bad for your wellbeing?

Dec 2nd, 2016 by

For some, hookups and one-night stands can lead to increased confidence – but, for others, it can damage self-esteem and cause psychological distress

Casual sex, hookups or one-night stands: whatever you call it, more than half of us will have sex with someone we barely know or don’t expect to date in the future. We’re most likely to do this at university, where up to 80% of undergraduates have hookups. Sex within relationships is said to improve cardiovascular health, reduce depression and boost immunity, but social science research has often linked casual encounters to feelings of sexual regret, low self-esteem and psychological distress, especially among women. Studies show that while men regret the sexual opportunities they missed, women often regret some of the casual sex they did have.

Continue reading…

Continue Reading »
0 Comments

Can you tell how drunk you are?

Dec 2nd, 2016 by

A new study has found that boozers out on the town are more likely to underestimate their drunkenness if their companions are also drinking heavily. The lesson? Take a sober friend with you

Can you tell if you have had too much to drink? Do you count alcohol units, or try walking in a straight line? Turns out we base our judgment on the sobriety – or not – of those around us. Research from four Welsh city-centre pubs and clubs, published in the journal BMC Public Health found that people were more likely to underestimate how much alcohol they had drunk when surrounded by others who were inebriated. Such company also made them feel more relaxed about the health risks of boozing.

The solution

Continue reading…

Continue Reading »
0 Comments

Powered by WP Robot