Subscribe to RSS Feed

Damon Hill: depression does not have to spell the end for a sportsperson

Nov 2nd, 2016 by

• F1’s 1996 world champion says problems can be overcome
• It is possible to have a blip and get a handle on it, says Hill

Damon Hill has opened up on his battle with depression – but believes it is possible for a sportsperson to recover from the illness and achieve further success.

The 1996 Formula One world champion saw a therapist as he battled with mental illness during and after his racing career. “I didn’t know why I should be feeling that when I apparently should be one of the happiest men alive,” he told BBC Radio 5 Live. “I’ve got four lovely children, I’ve got a beautiful wife and all the things that you’re supposed to be very grateful for.

Related: Damon Hill explores his depression amid reflection on family tragedy | Richard Williams

Related: From Bruce Springsteen to Tyson Fury, men are opening up about depression

Continue reading…

Continue Reading »
0 Comments

‘My nose is askew, my chin is formidable – it’s me, all right’ … a portrait of my mental health

Nov 2nd, 2016 by

Gail Porter, Ricky Hatton, Bill Oddie … in her portrait series Bipolar Picasso, Andrea Tyrimos explores our attitudes to mental illness. Mark Rice-Oxley joins the stars laying themselves bare in her studio

It can be unsettling to be painted. The last person who tried to paint me was my daughter. She missed out my mouth. Now Andrea Tyrimos is having a go. I’m optimistic that she will do a better job as a) she is a proper artist, and b) she is planning to exhibit the piece in a gallery later this week, alongside nine other portraits of people who, like me, suffer from mental illnesses.

All of which sounds a bit glum, until I turn up one afternoon at her north London studio to inspect progress. There I am, on a canvas 4ft by 4ft, leering down at myself as if to say: ‘What do you think you’re doing here?’ I’m slightly startled by how good a likeness it is. My nose is askew and my chin is formidable. It’s me, all right.

Related: Depression of Alastair Campbell and Amy Winehouse captured for exhibition

Continue reading…

Continue Reading »
0 Comments

Neoliberalism is creating loneliness. That’s what’s wrenching society apart | George Monbiot

Nov 2nd, 2016 by

Epidemics of mental illness are crushing the minds and bodies of millions. It’s time to ask where we are heading and why

What greater indictment of a system could there be than an epidemic of mental illness? Yet plagues of anxiety, stress, depression, social phobia, eating disorders, self-harm and loneliness now strike people down all over the world. The latest, catastrophic figures for children’s mental health in England reflect a global crisis.

Related: Children’s mental health in crisis – readers share their stories

Social media brings us together and drives us apart, allowing us precisely to quantify our social standing

Related: Self-harm the ‘biggest killer of people in their early 20s’ in the UK

Related: 10 reasons people are lonely? It’s more complicated than that | Sue Bourne

Continue reading…

Continue Reading »
0 Comments

I had heard clean eating made you feel better – but for me it went wrong

Oct 2nd, 2016 by

My healthy eating plan led to anorexia and depression. Food bloggers should make it clear that everything is OK in moderation

I got into clean eating with a friend around my AS levels, when I was 16. My friends only followed the diet for about two weeks but when they all stopped I continued. I got addicted to it and I lost loads of weight.

We all started the diet because we were really stressed and tired and had heard eating better made you feel better, but for me it went wrong.

Related: Clean eating trend can be dangerous for young people, experts warn

Continue reading…

Continue Reading »
0 Comments

Secret Teacher: I love teaching, but I’m tired of feeling like a failure

Oct 2nd, 2016 by

The unrelenting pressure of the job tipped me into depression. After almost 20 years, I’ve realised that it’s just not worth it

When I began teaching 18 years ago, I poured everything I had into it. I started at a tough inner-city Manchester school. I ran after-school football and film clubs, and produced Shakespeare plays with 8- to 11-year-olds. I was glad to be observed 10 times in a gruelling five-day Ofsted visit (it was 1998). I put so much in and got so much out – I was young, single and I didn’t care about late nights and early mornings.

Related: Secret Teacher: I dare not tell anyone about my personality disorder

Related: Secret Teacher: I couldn’t cope with full-time teaching and fatherhood

Continue reading…

Continue Reading »
0 Comments

Women taking pill more likely to be treated for depression, study finds

Oct 2nd, 2016 by

Danish research finds that women on combined contraceptive pill are 23% more likely to be prescribed antidepressants

Women who take the contraceptive pill are more likely to be treated for depression, according to a large study.

Millions of women worldwide use hormonal contraceptives, and there have long been reports that they can affect mood. A research project was launched in Denmark to look at the scale of the problem, involving the medical records of more than a million women and adolescent girls.

Continue reading…

Continue Reading »
0 Comments

Tom Wills grave restoration project reveals football’s heart, soul and history

Oct 2nd, 2016 by

A quest to restore the grave of Australia’s first cricket great and the father of Aussie Rules has brought a Melbourne teacher personal salvation

If there’s something a lifetime of following footy teaches you it’s that the rain never arrives when you want it to. With that in mind I find myself standing in a persistent drizzle on the corner of Upper Heidelberg road and Darebin street in Heidelberg, 13km north-east of Melbourne, on a dark and gloomy morning that at least offers a bright prospect.

Local English as an additional language teacher, amateur football historian and true believer Phil Dimitriadis is about to guide me through the gates of Warringal cemetery to the newly restored grave of Tom Wills, the founder and father of Australian rules football. Finals beckon, so its hard to begrudge winter’s lingering chill.

Continue reading…

Continue Reading »
0 Comments

Facing my fear: to conquer depression, I had to embrace it | Ed Halliwell

Oct 2nd, 2016 by

I didn’t think accepting my symptoms would be helpful. But slowly, it became clear that meditation works for me

I’d been running from or fighting my depression for two and a half years, and neither approach had worked. Relentlessly dogged by self-punishing thoughts, heavy, tensed-up limbs, heart palpitations and a churning gut, I’d done everything I could to shake myself clear of the continuing hell of daily existence.

Related: Tell us about a time you faced your fear

Related: Facing my fear: I was molested as a child. Would my own kids judge me for it? | Zoe Zolbrod

Continue reading…

Continue Reading »
0 Comments

Shaun Tan completes graphic novel after author Mel Tregonning’s suicide: ‘Her absence made me try even harder’

Oct 2nd, 2016 by

Small Things tells of a lonely boy, struggling with worry. But the author also had mental health issues, and died before it was finished

It would be too easy to draw parallels between the suffering artist and her creation: she draws a child, sad and anxious, being eaten away by strange shapes, the self diminishing.

There are no words. Just a silent world of intricate artwork, hundreds of black and white drawings of a small boy, lonely in his ordinary life, with an obvious theme of mental torment. The artist works doggedly on this one picture book for eight years then, when she is so close to finishing, only a few drawings to go, she takes her own life.

Related: Bloodbaths and bad dreams: Shaun Tan’s fairytale sculptures

Continue reading…

Continue Reading »
0 Comments

Indian technology institute to put the art of happiness under the microscope

Oct 2nd, 2016 by

Kharagpur research centre will examine theory that investment in mental health of citizens reaps economic as well as spiritual reward

Build roads, electrify villages, clean up the holy river Ganges: for the past 70 years, successive governments in India have stuck with virtually identical to-do lists for the country’s development. Now, a new item seems to have cropped up on the political agenda: make people happy.

In July, the central Indian state of Madhya Pradesh announced it would open a ministry of happiness, and start a string of happiness-inducing programmes including yoga, arts, and free religious pilgrimages for the elderly.

Related: Bhutan: where happiness is at the heart of the political agenda – in pictures

Continue reading…

Continue Reading »
0 Comments

Powered by WP Robot